Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Includes two Panavia Tornado IDS aircraft, flight stand with tall stem, four rare-earth magnets, decal sheet & Unit Card.

The Tornado strike-aircraft was developed as a joint project between Germany, Britain, and Italy. The main role of the Tornado is as an Interdictor Strike (IDS) aircraft.

The Tornado is armed with two internally mounted 27mm Mauser BK-27 auto-cannons and two AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles for self-defence. It can carry a variety of conventional bombs, as well as the MW-1 submunition dispenser that drops a variety of munitions, including the KB44 antitank bomblet.

Designed by Evan Allen
Painted by Aaron Mathie

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Leopard

All across West Germany divisions are being mobilised and reservists flock to their barracks for assignment to the front. With their powerful Leopard 2 tanks and panzergrenadiers mounted in the Marder infantry fighting vehicles, they fight with skill and cunning to slow the Soviet advance, determined to protect their homes and families.

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Leopard - West Germans in World War III
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
The Tornado has a variable sweep-wing system. The pilot can change the sweep of the wings to change the aerodynamics of the aircraft. With the wings swept back drag was reduced during critical high-speed low-level dashes towards enemy positions. With the wings swept forward the Tornado takes on the characteristics of slower flight, allowing it to land and take off on short runways. Low-level flight was further enhanced by an innovative automatic terrain-following system.
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)

Tornado Strike Flight Box Contents
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Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
a. 2x Tornado body

b. 2x MW-1 submunition dispensers.

c. 2x Tornado nose cones.
Flight Stands (x2) Tall Flight Stand Stems (x2)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Decal Sheet (x1) Unit Card (x1)
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)

Assembling the Tornado
Tip:Your resin parts SHOULD reach you in perfect condition. But if any of the thin sections like wings are bent out of shape, don't worry – they can be straightened easily. Dip the part in hot (near boiling) water for 5-10 seconds. The heat will make the resin slightly flexible, so you can gently straighten it out. While holding it straight, ether allow it to cool naturally, or dip it in cold water to re-harden it instantly. Just remember to be gentle, as the resin is quite brittle when it is cold.
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Step 1: Glue the nose cone on to the body. To make sure you orient the nose cone correctly, not that rounded shape is somewhat flatter at the bottom. Below: The nose cone attached correctly.
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Step 2. Attach the MW-1 submunitions dispenser, using the shaped plug and hole to help with correct alignment.
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Assembling The Flight Stand

Step One
Cut the parts of the flight stand off the plastic sprue using a sharp hobby knife or a pair of hobby cutters.
Cutting the parts off the plastic sprue Cutting the parts off the plastic sprue Cutting the parts off the plastic sprue
The stalk of the flight stand attached to the base

Step Two
Attach the stem to the flight stand base. The hard plastic of the flight stand will bond firmly with plastic cement, but you can also use superglue.

There are two sizes of stem; the standard practice is to use the shorter stem for helicopters and the tall stem for strike aircraft, to bolster the impression that they are flying at a higher altitude. But there's no reason you shouldn't use the tall stem for helicopters if you like how it looks.

Left:The stem attached to the base.

Step Three
Add the magnet cap to the top of the stem. The cap fits snugly to the top of the stem, so you will only need a small amount of glue to neatly secure the magnet cap in place.

Step Four
The cap has a recess to hold one of the supplied rare-earth magnets, to create a solid connection between the stand and the aircraft model. The tabs at the front and back help keep the aircraft pointing in the right direction.
The magnet cap on top of the stork Adding a magnet to the cap
1. The bottom of the aircraft has a recess for a magnet and slots to match with the tabs on the cap. 2. A second magnet is the glued into the recess, making sure the polarities match. 3. Mated perfectly, the flight stand, aircraft and magnets create a solid, stable connection.
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13) Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)
Below: An assembled Tornado on its flight stand.
Tornado Strike Flight (TGBX13)